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Surface Science Newsletter – Issue 49
How the skin tolerance of a lotion can be measured

How the skin tolerance of a lotion can be measured

The cosmetics industry is in a state of upheaval. Consumers are increasingly turning their backs on petrochemical products and prefer sustainable, biogenic ingredients. Manufacturers of emulsifiers are also reacting to this trend and testing new surfactants. Whether the skin accepts an active ingredient well depends on the amount of free surfactant molecules: if an emulsifier is effective even in small quantities and also quickly binds free surfactants into agglomerates such as micelles or liposomes, then it is potentially skin-friendly. In cooperation with Lonza Ltd. (Basel, Switzerland) and Azelis GmbH (Moers, Germany), we accompanied the investigation of a new emulsifier for low-viscosity, sprayable leave-on skin products and in particular analyzed its surface-active efficacy depending on the concentration.

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Product
ADVANCE: Manage user rights and analyze adhesion comprehensively

ADVANCE: Manage user rights and analyze adhesion comprehensively

  • Maintain an overview and control access to measurements and projects: User rights management (URM) in the new version of ADVANCE provides the ideal balance between transparency and data security.
  • Optimize wettability and adhesion based on valuable data: As an extension of the surface free energy calculation, ADVANCE offers new evaluation options with Adhesion Analysis.
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Application
Foam under high pressure: Measurements for optimized oil production
Foam under high pressure: Measurements for optimized oil production

Does foam become more stable or does it disintegrate more quickly when the pressure rises? And how do foams formed with different gases differ under high pressures? In tertiary oil production, these questions do not arise out of mere curiosity, but because the success of foam-based production methods depends on how foam behaves under the pressure and temperature conditions of a reservoir. The High Pressure Foam Analyzer – HPFA is the first measuring instrument to simultaneously investigate the stability and bubble structure of foams over a long period of time at pressures of up to 35 MPa (350 bar). Read our application report on the behavior of nitrogen foams at different pressures and on stability differences between foams formed with nitrogen or carbon dioxide.

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Beyond the surface
A Guinness against buoyancy

A Guinness against buoyancy

Foam cascades moving downwards in a liquid: a freshly filled Guinness in a pint glass might have made Archimedes doubt his theory of buoyancy. A team of researchers from Osaka University deciphered the mechanisms of this apparent reversal of gravity: directly on the glass wall, a bubble-free liquid film flows downwards, dragging the bubbles that are further away from the edge. Because these bubbles simultaneously strive upwards due to the buoyancy, a wave-like flow movement is created. But why does this phenomenon occur almost exclusively in Guinness? This is due to the particularly small bubbles caused by foaming with nitrogen – instead of carbon dioxide as is the case with most other beers. And it must not be any kind of glass either, because the wall of the upwardly expanding pint glass has exactly the right inclination. This is another result of the investigation: if the glass wall is vertical or not inclined enough, the fascinating interplay between downward flow and buoyancy does not occur.

Magnetic fluid as variable mold for optical lenses

Magnetic fluid as variable mold for optical lenses

The high-precision metal casting molds used for the production of optical polymer lenses are complex to manufacture and correspondingly expensive. Lenses with precisely defined focal lengths and sizes cannot therefore be produced in small quantities. A new method developed at Washington State University that makes use of interfacial tension promises to remedy this situation. Using iron nanoparticles, the researchers mixed a magnetically manipulable liquid. This formed a stable two-phase system with the initially liquid silicone-based lens material. The scientists were able to magnetically deform the ideally smooth interface and use it as a "liquid casting mold" with any surface curvature. The result after curing was precise lenses with accurately defined properties as individual pieces.

Events
Secure your seminar place now

Secure your seminar place now

Learn how to improve your products and processes with surface science! In the second half of the year you can deepen your knowledge in our seminars at several international locations:

Canada (London, ON)

  • Interfacial Tension | August 27
  • Wettability & Adhesion | August 28
  • Laboratory Day | August 29
Information and sign-up

UK (Bristol)
  • Surface Tension | September 17
  • Contact Angle | September 18
Information and sign-up

Switzerland (Basel)
  • Grenzflächenchemie | September 19
Information and sign-up

Austria (Vienna)
  • Grenzflächenchemie | November 05
Information and sign-up

We would be happy to welcome you at one of the events.

Webinar about Surface Treatment and Surface Free Energy

Webinar about Surface Treatment and Surface Free Energy

You want to know how to improve the adhesion of your products? Join us for our first webinar about scientific diagnostics and surface treatment together with Enercon on Thursday, August 08 at 11:00 am EST. Check out the webinar content and sign up today!



Meet us at international conferences and exhibitions

Meet us at international conferences and exhibitions

We look forward to demonstrating our innovative technology in the field of interfacial analysis and meeting you at the following events:

  • National Symposium of Colloids & Interfaces
    July 29 - August 1 | Jiangsu, China
  • ACS National Meeting & Exhibition
    August 25 - 29 | San Diego, CA, USA
    Booth 1834

Check out our events page to find out about all the fairs and conferences we will be attending in the coming months.